Breaking News: UN Sanctions

The United Nations unanimously adopted a new round of sanctions Monday, targeting the import of oil and North Korean labor. The resolution, in the words of American Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Hailey, says “the world will never accept a nuclear North Korea,” (Wall Street Journal).

The sanctions adopted targeted a wide variety of industries. They placed a ban on North Korean textiles; limited import of oil to North Korea; and targeted North Korean labor, imposing a “humanitarian” clause for  future labor and letting all workers on contracts beginning before the imposition of the sanctions to continue work. This round is a watered down version of suggestions circulated by America following North Korea’s nuclear test (CNN).

The question, as with all sanctions, is the quality of implementation. The “humanitarian” loophole has caused concern in the past and made implementing sanctions difficult. It is also unclear how cooperative China will be after forcing other states to water down the resolution. Though strong, the overall effectiveness of the sanctions will be a question to follow throughout the next few months.

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Breaking News: Artifical Earthquake in North Korea

On Sunday, a 6.3 magnitude earthquake struck North Korea. It’s point of origin was Pyunggye-ri, North Korea’s nuclear test site, raising fears that North Korea conducted its sixth nuclear test. South Korean military is monitoring the situation, as the rest of the world waits for more data surrounding the quake.

More to come.

Breaking News: Missiles Again

North Korea has launched another missile today, its second one this week. Japan’s NHK broke news of the launch, and told its citizens to be safe. The missile reportedly flew over Japan, and is most likely a show of strength by Pyongyang. (Yonhap Reporting). I am following the test and will add it to my second missile test analysis post.

Breaking News: A New Set of Launches

North Korea reportedly launched several missiles from Gangwando Province into the East Sea. The launch comes as South Korea and the United States are engaging in military drills on the peninsula, a time always fraught with high tensions and tough rhetoric.

Trump has yet to respond to the launch. Instead, the American president is currently at Camp David, monitoring Hurricane Harvey as it makes landfall in Texas. (In other news, I’ve been a little obsessed with Harvey as my hometown will be hit by parts of the storm.)

I will work on an update to this test and will have my ICBM analysis up soon. Thank you all for being patient.

It’s a Comeback!

Wow, summer was a busy time and I am glad that it is winding down. Since I have had some changes in my life, it will be possible for more time to be devoted to this blog and I am super excited that I am able to come back and restart posting!

I am going to restart this week with a special post on the rising tensions on the peninsula, arguing that North Korea’s ICBM tests were, for lack of better terms, telegraphed through past events and, despite the rapid changes, that the current arsenal in Pyongyang’s possession is not a direct threat to the United States. I also hope to illuminate some paths forward toward de-escalating the tensions currently on the peninsula. I am going to try to get at least one longer argument post out per month, but hopefully more.

Next week, I will start posting normally and I am glad to be back writing Daily Updates, Breaking News reports, special posts, and more. Thank you for staying with me and I hope you all are ready to gain more understanding to the Korean peninsula!

Corrections: A previous rendition of this post used the word “eliminate” when it should have said “illuminate.”

North Korea Missile Launch

Today, North Korea launched a missile, following which Kim said that the entire United States mainland is in range of their arsenal. Such advancement in North Korea’s missile technology is tourbling. This new technology, however troubling it may seem, was a long time coming.

To get a better understanding of what North Korea’s recent missile developments mean and how they came to be, I will post a more in-depth analysis in the coming days.